Every time you turn on the radio or the telly these days, its doom and gloom and credit crunch.  None of us, whatever our financial ‘profile’ is immune from the effects of this, whether its the pension fund, or the high street bank we use, exchange rates, cost of heating and fuel, food, mortgage, even jobs.  How does the Gospel speak into our lives this week?   How does it fire up our faith when the going gets a bit tough?  How does it support our catechesis for bringing people into communion with Christ?  The entrance antiphon for 29th Sunday in OT is a call for  protection, the opening prayer for strength and joy, Isaiah ‘from the rising to the setting of the sun, apart from me, all is nothing’.  Paul begins his letter offering grace and peace from God, and encouraging faith in action – ‘when we brought the good news to you, it came to you not only as words, but as power and as the Holy Spirit and as utter conviction’.  Jesus, caught between a rock and a hard place, says legitimate government has authority and deserves our co-operation.   Easy to get bogged down in worries, payment of bills and taxes, and forget to cash in the revealed treasure of God’s salvation, freedom, and all the gifts poured out for our lived lives!  These wonderful mysteries of our faith and our ordinary lives are not separate realities, but find their full expression in each other.  As Seamus O’Connell, Professor of Scripture at Maynooth says, some people in restaurants refuse to put down the menu and do not taste the food – we know the teaching, we know the Gospel – but its useless unless we consume it and allow it to nourish us for every eventually, every worry, every ‘crunch’, every need.  The Communion antiphon from Sunday’s Liturgy supplies: ‘See how the eyes of the Lord are on those who fear him, on those who hope in his love;  that he may rescue them from death and feed them in time of famine.’  Let’s be aware of people whose basic needs are not being met.

Become conscious about basic needs

Become conscious about basic needs